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ReggaeRecord.com Dub Store Sound Inc. Online Store for Reggae & Black Music - Reggaerecord.Com

Reggae & Black Music Online Store

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Harmonizers - Go Back Home
BUY

Harmonizers

Go Back Home / Go Back Home (Alternative Take)

Gay Feet/Dub Store Records JPN1967

¥1580 (US$13.72)

Roots rock steady from The Harmonizers recorded around 1967 proclaiming to go back to Africa. Backed with previously unreleased alternative cut.

Joe Higgs - Sensation Of Love
BUY

Joe Higgs / Valentines

Sensation Of Love / Sock It To Me Baby

Gay Feet/Dub Store Records JPN1967

¥1580 (US$13.72)

Previously unreleased Joe Higgs' extremely rare rock steady for Gay Feet. On flip a stunning chorus by The Valentines.

Johnny, Attractions - Call Of The Drums
BUY

Johnny, Attractions / Leslie Butler, Count Ossie

Call Of The Drums / Call Of The Drums Rhythm 2

Gay Feet/Dub Store Records JPN1967

¥1580 (US$13.72)

Marvellous binghi rock steady masterpiece by Count Ossie led Johnny & The Attractions. An unreleased alternative instrumentalal cut on flip.

Roland Alphonso - ABC Rocksteady
BUY

Roland Alphonso

ABC Rocksteady

Dub Store Records JPN1968

¥2880 (US$25.00)

Rare and seriously sought after instrumental album of Gay Feet rocksteady hits from 1968.

Eleven elegant instrumental tracks, and one female vocal, showcasing the tenor sax artistry of master musician Roland Alphonso, ably assisted by Aubrey Adams on organ and the inestimable Lynn Taitt on guitar, interpreting a selection of Mrs Pottinger's most memorable hits of the era.

Roland Alphonso - ABC Rocksteady
BUY

Roland Alphonso

ABC Rocksteady

Dub Store Records JPN1968

¥2376 (US$20.63)

Rare and seriously sought after instrumental album of Gay Feet rocksteady hits from 1968.

Eleven elegant instrumental tracks, and one female vocal, showcasing the tenor sax artistry of master musician Roland Alphonso, ably assisted by Aubrey Adams on organ and the inestimable Lynn Taitt on guitar, interpreting a selection of Mrs Pottinger's most memorable hits of the era.

Stranger Cole, Patsy Millicent Todd - You Took My Love
BUY

Stranger Cole, Patsy Millicent Todd / Webber Sisters

You Took My Love / Good Thing Come To Those Who Wait

Gay Feet/Dub Store Records JPN1966

¥1580 (US$13.72)

Patsy's classic slow ska backed with Webber Sisters previously unreleased rock steady piece pushing forward til their day comes.

Specials - Live At The Lyceum
BUY

Estimated Delivery 1-6 weeks

Pionners - No Dope Me Pony
BUY

Temporarily sold out. Uncertain delivery time

Rico Rodriguez - Tribute To Dondrummond
BUY

Temporarily sold out. Uncertain delivery time

Various - Merritone Rock Steady 2: This Music Got Soul 1966-1967 (2LP)
BUY

Various

Merritone Rock Steady 2: This Music Got Soul 1966-1967 (2LP)

Dub Store Records JPN1966- 1967

¥4320 (US$37.50)

American rhythm & blues fervour, boosted by a multitude of sound systems playing 78rpm records on increasingly larger sets, gripped Jamaica from the late forties onwards but, towards the end of the decade, the American audience began to move towards a somewhat softer sound. The driving rhythm & blues discs became increasingly hard to find and the more progressive Jamaican sound system operators, realising that they now needed to make their own music, turned to Kingston’s jazz and big band musicians to record one off custom cut discs. These were not initially intended for commercial release but designed solely for sound system play on acetate or ‘dub plates’ as they would later be termed. These ‘specials’ soon began to eclipse the popularity of American rhythm & blues and the demand for their locally produced music proved so great that the sound system operators began to release their music commercially on vinyl and became record producers. Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd, Duke Reid ‘The Trojan’ and Prince Buster, who operated his Voice Of The People Sound System, were among the first to establish themselves in this new role and the nascent Jamaican recording industry now went into overdrive.

In 1954 Ken Khouri had numbered among the first far sighted entrepreneurs to produce mento records with local musicians (mento is Jamaica’s original indigenous music) before progressing to opening Jamaica’s first record manufacturing plant. Three years later he moved his operation to Foreshore Road (later renamed Marcus Garvey Drive) where, with the assistance of the inestimable Graeme Goodall, he updated and upgraded his recording studio. The importance of this enterprising move was critical to the development of Jamaican music and its influence both profound and far reaching.